Stellar Reviews

Reviews of the works of author Jerred Metz. Have one to share? Let us know with your comment below!

The Angel of Mons
A brilliant combination of factual & visionary writing. Metz re-imagines the Battle of Mons, a crucial battle early in World War I, in which legend holds that an angelic host led by St. George appeared & led the outnumbered British troops to a miraculous victory. The grit of the trenches, the fears of the soldiers, their visionary experiences, along with details of terrain, weaponry, and military strategies are all presented convincingly. In the wake of the the battle & the strange stories surrounding it, Metz explores the question of the existence of a supernatural realm, employing a fascinating cast of contemporary characters, most of whom were involved in the spiritual movements of the day. These include Williams Butler Yeats, Aleister Crowley, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and his famous creation, Sherlock Holmes. The book is highly readable. It entertains, informs, and provokes thought.
Earl Durand Cover5.0 out of 5 stars The Last 11 days of Earl Durand 
Format:Hardcover
A great factual read about some of the history of Northwest Wyoming and the struggle in the transition from the old west to the modern USA.
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding!
Format:Hardcover
A superbly written history of a little-known, bloody story about Earl Durand, who basically terrorized northwestern Wyoming early in the 20th century.
A “must” for aficionados of Western history.
200-120
210-260
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SY0-401
810-403
300-320
400-101
70-533
N10-006
MB2-707
200-120
210-260
200-310
SY0-401
810-403
300-320
400-101
70-533
N10-006
MB2-707
210-060
400-201
9L0-012
642-999
300-115
MB5-705
70-461
1V0-601
300-206
352-001
70-486
300-135
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PR000041
300-101
70-346
CCA-500
70-480
810-403
200-120
400-101
CISSP
200-120
210-260
200-310
SY0-401
810-403
300-320
400-101
70-533
N10-006
MB2-707
210-060
100-101
1Z0-803
9L0-012
70-480
200-310
EX300
ICBB
1Z0-808
AWS-SYSOPS
1Z0-434
300-070
CAS-002
352-001
1V0-601
220-801
N10-006
642-999
SSCP
PMP
642-997
300-115
70-410
101-400
ITILFND
300-075
AX0-100
400-051
2V0-621
70-486
MB5-705
102-400
101
1Z0-067
220-802
70-463
C_TAW12_731
70-494
CISM
PR000041
700-501
300-135
200-120
CISSP
400-101
810-403
300-320
210-060
300-070
210-260
300-075
300-101
NSE4
EX200
300-115
100-101
200-120
210-260
200-310
SY0-401
810-403
300-320
400-101
70-533
N10-006
MB2-707
210-060
400-201
350-018
ADM-201
CISSP
810-403
200-120
400-101
CISSP
300-320
350-018
300-101
210-260
300-208
MB2-707
400-201
SY0-401
70-462
EX200
100-101
1Z0-803
300-135
200-120
CISSP
400-101
810-403
300-320
210-060
300-070
5.0 out of 5 stars My Family Was There! 
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
In 1939 my grandfather ran the grocery store only a few doors down from the bank where the final shootout occurred(see photo). I’m sure he was in the store when bullets started whizzing up and down the street outside. But, amazingly, although I spent a lot of time with my grandfather, I don’t remember ever hearing even one word about the Earl Durand calamity as I grew up. It wasn’t until 3 years ago when it came up in a discussion between my mother & her twin sister that I learned that such a Bonnie and Clyde type escapade had taken place in their tiny home town. My mother had been at the University of Wyoming at the time but her sister was in Powell. Now, 64 years later, they were 85 years old and not very clear on the details. I read all the old newspaper accounts I could find to try and flesh out the story but still didn’t feel I had any clear understanding of the events. This summer on a visit to Powell I opened the Powell Tribune and read about this new book on Earl Durand. I immediately bought it and found it spellbinding. Its style of using eyewitness accounts makes you feel like you were actually there. I didn’t mind the repetition at all. On the contrary I found that hearing about the same events from different perspectives was very illuminating. Jerred Metz is to be congratulated for doing it this way. This was a story that needed to be told to fill out the history of the Bighorn basin. Anyone interested in the west of pre-WWII days should read it.
Would you poach to feed your starving neighbors?
This review is from: The Last Eleven Days Of Earl Durand (Paperback)
This historical account of the hunt for Earl Durand that captured the hearts and the minds of Americans when it happened is “told by” people involved in the posse, as well as the young poacher who took part in the crime that started Earl Durand’s fall from grace. The writer’s literary mastery is obvious from the first paragraph of the first chapter. Then the work takes on a reporting tone: simple, honest, and factual, “spoken” in the language of the era and the region, with controversial views on Earl Durand by his contemporaries. It’s rather obvious that the writer went thought great pains to research the era, the participants, and the event. The book contains photographs of the posse members; it contains a map of the area, as well as pictures of Earl Durand. Was Earl Durand a clod-blooded killer? Did he go insane? Or, was he a misunderstood free spirit living in a wrong century? Was he only to blame for his demise? Or did his environment have something to do with it? The book, simple on the surface in its reporting style, raises many questions regarding human condition and morality in the industrial/post-industrial society of a “remote” location in Wyoming during the Great Depression. If you were a capable hunter living near the bountiful government-protected land, and your neighbors were starving for the lack of work in a miserable economy, would you go poaching to feed your neighbors? I rate the book at 4 only because there is some painful (for my personal taste), yet hardly avoidable repetition as the storytellers take turns re-telling their versions of the same event.